Category Archives: kidlitwomen

#KidLitWomen – Book a Day in March (31)

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Today is my last post for my Book A Day in March in honor of Women’s History Month and #kidlitwomen. It’s been a joy to be able to share some of my favorite books and I’m sad that the month isn’t longer so I could share all the books I didn’t get to. Then I remembered – hey, this is my reading blog! I can get back to posting my favorite reads regularly! I won’t post every day, but I’ll try to post at least once a week, and once things settle down a little for me in my busy life (for which I’m grateful), I will return to a Tuesday/Thursday posting schedule. My goal here is to feature books by women/about girls and #ownvoices, and to highlight books that aren’t getting all the buzz and attention. I want to share books that you might not have heard of. And I hope you’ll do the same in the comments – tell me what books you are reading and loving! Thanks for following along! And now for the Book A Day –

Are You An Echo? The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko narrative and translation by David Jacobson, Sally Ito, and Michiko Tsuboi, illustrated by Toshikado Hajiri. A fascinating account of Japanese poet Misuzu Kaneko, interspersed with her simple but evocative poetry. Her poems are part of the curriculum for elementary students in Japan. I fell in love with her poetry and hope you will, too. Buy the book!

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#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (30)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today’s book is middle grade novel An Unlikely Story of A Pig in the City by Jodi Kendall.

A story about a girl in a big family who feels invisible, but then feels a sense of purpose when the family inadvertently adopts a runt pig. But they can’t keep it because they live in a city, so Josie convinces her parents to let her keep the pig while she searches for the right home for Hamlet (while secretly hoping to convince them to let her keep him). Sweet story that made me tear up during the Christmas gift exchange scene. I’m a sucker for animal stories! Buy the book!

#kidlitwomen

#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (29)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today’s book is the YA novel It’s Not Like It’s A Secret by Misa Sugiura. I was so pleased to read a teen novel with an authentic Japanese American main character in a contemporary setting – and in San Jose, no less, near where I lived for awhile.

Sixteen-year-old Sana Kiyohara has many secrets from feeling like she never fits in with her friends in Wisconsin to her suspicion that her father may be having an affair. When they move to San Jose, CA for her father’s new job, Sana is at first resistant, but when she meets a very cute girl who ends up going to her new high school, Sana is intrigued. Better yet, she immediately falls in with a group of Asian girls and suddenly she feels seen and heard, understood – as they compare their parents’ strict rules and traditions. But breaking into her crush Jamie’s crowd is difficult and poses many challenges. A story about learning to trust sharing truths with friends and family. Buy the book!

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#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (28)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today’s featured book is YA novel, Love, Hate, & Other Filters by Samira Ahmed. Love this quote from this book: We must build bridges, conquer hate with love, and meet intolerance with a renewed commitment to education and open-mindedness. From many, we are one.

Senior in high school Maya Aziz has a dream of pursuing a career in film, including going to college in New York – far from her small town of Batavia, IL. Her parents have other ideas, wanting her to be a good Indian Muslim daughter and staying near home (and marrying a Muslim). Maya struggles against her parents’ expectations while nursing an enormous crush on (non-parental approved) Phil. As their friendship/relationship blooms, a terrorist attack in nearby Springfield triggers anti-Muslim hate against Maya’s parents’ dental practice and then suddenly her parents are against her not only leaving to go to college in New York but almost against her leaving the house at all. A story about finding your way when you’re afraid – a story about love and family and growing up, and taking a stand for your dreams. Buy the book!

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#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (27)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today I’m wishing a very happy book birthday to Lights, Camera, Disaster by Erin Dionne, one of my favorite people! I loved her previous middle grade novels, Moxie and the Art of Rule Breaking and Ollie and the Science of Treasure Hunting, so I know I’m going to love her newest and can’t wait to dive in.

From the publisher: Hester Greene loves making movies. With her camera in hand, she can focus, make decisions, and have the control she lacks in life, where her executive function disorder (think extreme ADHD plus anxiety) sabotages her every move. But middle school is not a movie, and if her last-ditch attempt to save her language-arts grade–and her chance to pass eighth grade, period–doesn’t work, Hess could lose her friends, her year, even her camera. It will take more than a cool training montage to get her life together, but by thinking outside the frame, she just might craft a whole new ending. Written partially in script form, with STOP/PAUSE/PLAY/REWIND moments throughout, this laugh-out-loud story will speak to any budding filmmaker, or unintentional troublemaker, in every act of their lives. Buy the book!

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#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (26)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today’s featured book is The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Perez.

I loved this book! Twelve-year-old Malú (María Luisa) is not happy about moving to Chicago for two years, because of her mom’s (whom she calls Super Mexican) job, leaving behind her dad and everything she loves. As school starts, Malú feels out of place and tries to embrace her inner punk, something she associates with her dad. Her mother makes her feel “not enough,” especially when she keeps trying to push her Mexican culture on her. Malú can’t speak Spanish well, hates cilantro, and doesn’t want to be una señorita – at least not the kind her mom wants her to be. When Malú finds a group of kids and decides to form a punk rock band for the school talent show, she finally feels like she might like her new home, but will it last? And will her mom prevent her from being in this band? I rooted for Malú! Buy the book!

#kidlitwomen

#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (25)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today’s featured book is Cilla Lee-Jenkins, Future Author Extraordinaire by Susan Tan. I’ve had the honor of not only meeting Susan, but doing an event with her. She’s super nice, and talented, too!

Cilla Lee-Jenkins is not overly thrilled that she is soon to become a big sister to The Blob (the nickname she gives to her sister after seeing the sonogram). To ensure that her family doesn’t forget about her, she writes a story about the one topic she knows best, herself. Cilla is full of honesty, great imagination, and humor as she embarks on her quest while dealing with feelings of jealousy over her soon-to-be sibling. Buy the book!

And in two days you can buy the follow up book, Cilla Lee-Jenkins, This Book is A Classic! Pre-order the book!

#kidlitwomen

#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (24)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today’s featured book is middle grade novel The Countdown Conspiracy by Katie Slivensky.

Miranda, age 13 and a high school graduate, is chosen as one of six kids for a mission to Mars. She is sent off to a base in Antarctica for intensive years-long training where she meets her team, the brightest and best from around the world. But things don’t go as smoothly as she’d hoped. This action-packed adventurous book is a page-turner, and readers will fall in love with Miranda (and her robot, Ruby) and cheer her on. Author Katie is also a scientist and her love for science infuses her story. Buy the book!

Her next book, The Seismic Seven, is due out on June 5th!

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#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (23)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today’s feature book was a favorite of mine from 2014, after I met this author at a weekend workshop at VCFA – Promise of Shadows by Justina Ireland. Her name should be familiar to you as she is the author of the highly anticipated Dread Nation releasing on 4/3. I can’t wait to read it!

The story opens on Zephyr who is stuck in Tartarus’ worst section, the Pits, as punishment for killing one of Hera’s guards. Zeph is a Harpy but a failed one, and is scared when she knows she shouldn’t be. Fortunately she has found a protector in Cass. When her childhood friend (and crush) Tallon comes to the rescue to release her from the Underworld, she and Cass join Tallon, his dragon brother Blue, and Zeph’s childhood nemisis Alora in a quest to keep Hera from taking over the mortal world. Exciting and original and full of adventure and tension! I so loved this book that I still recommend it to readers. Buy the book!

And definitely pre-order Dread Nation!

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#KidLitWomen – Book A Day in March (22)

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See KidlitWomen for daily links to posts by the children’s lit community, in celebration of Women’s History Month and focusing on improving the climate for social and gender equality. I plan to share my favorite books focused on girl characters and/or written by women through this month.

Today I’m featuring Lou Lou & Pea and the Mural Mystery by Jill Diamond, illustrated by Lesley Vamos!

Lou Lou and Pea live in El Corazón, a tight-knit neighborhood where the two best friends can wander to visit their favorite neighbors and shops. But when bad things start to happen, from a ruined Quinceañera dress to Lou Lou’s prize camellia, the girls are determined to solve the mysteries, especially when they notice clues popping up in murals in the neighborhood. Buy the book! And keep your eye out for the second book, Lou Lou & Pea and the Bicentennial Bonanza coming out on 4/24!

#kidlitwomen